Tag: apple

Apple’s share of the smartwatch market

Posted by – April 30, 2016

Apple shares (NASDAQ: AAPL) went into a funk this week after slowing iPhone sales gave the stock its worst week since 2013 and high-profile investor Carl Icahn announced that he had completely sold his position in the Cupertino-based company due to concerns in China. On the far periphery of Apple’s consumer tech interests, however, is another product that generated huge waves up hype in 2016 – and that’s the Apple Watch.

Wearable tech – including smartwatches – is still a niche category without a clear path to challenging smartphones among consumer tech products right now. But Apple’s command over marketshare is still impressive. And a new report that came out on Thursday from the research firm Strategy Analytics shows where Apple stood in that marketplace as of the first quarter in 2016.

Apple shipped 2.2 million units in the smartwatch category in Q1, down from 5.1 million during Q4 in 2015, according to Neil Mawston, the executive director at Strategy Analytics. Those numbers may not be surprising to some observers noting that Q4 including holiday shipments, but Apple’s marketshare also dipped from Q4 of 2015 going into 2016, going from 63 percent to 52.4 percent.

Apple is obviously still the king of the space (as seen in the chart below), but slowing iPhone activity together with this marketshare drop mean that there’s going to be added pressure on the next Apple Watch to outperform its predecessor. (On a personal note: I’m still among the unconverted.)

 

Bloomsweekend

Posted by – April 12, 2015

National Arboretum

I’m doing the smart thing this year and waiting for peak tourism to subside before seeing the cherry blossoms, even if it means missing peak bloom. We did hit the National Arboretum for the first time last week, though. Blooming flowers were scare, though the Korean azaleas were out – and the old sandstone Corinthian columns that used to be part of the U.S. Capitol (until 1958) were impressive.

Other things in my line of sight that didn’t include the Basin cherry blossoms have included the following:

The new Daredevil series on Netflix

Wilson Fisk

This is one of the best casting jobs on a Marvel production yet. And I don’t just say that because people keep messaging me to tell me they think the guy playing Foggy Nelson looks like me. It’s heavy on violence – much heavier that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. on ABC ever will be, for instance. But it nails the Hell’s Kitchen of the comics. And I wouldn’t be sad to see Vincent D’Onofrio’s Wilson Fisk (show above) become a fixture within the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The world of Metro

D.C.’s entering a brave new world on Monday with Metro reintroducing automated trains to the Red Line. That news came on the heels of word that plans to only run eight-car trains by 2020 area getting scaled back. Though Metro anticipates 84,000 new daily weekday trips by that year, which means capacity shouldn’t be ignored.

DC Comics closed up shop in NYC

I hope the move to California is good for everyone who followed DC’s offices out of Manhattan. But the city is going to be a different place now. And I echo Marvel’s sentiments.

 

 

Book critic Salman Rushdie

Maybe the best story I read this week was about Salman Rushdie’s three-star review of To Kill a Mockingbird on Goodreads. Hey, at least he’s being honest about how he feels. More online reviews should reflect that level of candor.

Google wants Android Wear to communicate with iPhones

If this Verge report is true, it could be one of the best developments in recent years for mobile and wearable devices. Apple making iTunes available to Windows computers changed the game – even if the software eventually became a bloated jungle (a “toxic hellstew,” even). As was the case for Microsoft and Apple before, Apple letting Google release that app will be good for both companies (and consumers) in the long run. Here’s hoping Apple does the right thing.

Where Microsoft is catching up with Apple and vice versa

Posted by – December 19, 2011

My personalized cover to Flipboard this morning, featuring an Instagram photo from Sean Dove.

2011 was an exciting year for consumer tech developments. As Apple continued to devour market share in the PC market, Microsoft got behind their Kinect controller and got together with Nokia to give the Windows Phone platform a bigger push. I don’t think that you’ll find too many critics willing claim that Microsoft has been ahead of the game in the mobile or desktop OS markets over the last few years, but some notable apps and news stories have percolated recently that offer a little perspective on the battlegrounds and cross-pollinations that will be worth watching in 2012.

• First is the insurgence of Windows Phone-looking design concepts that have been making their way onto the iPhone. Like Bing vs. Google, Windows Phone interface designs have differentiated themselves from traditional iPhone dev schools of design. When I think of Windows Phone screens, I think of tight grids with big, sharp-edged boxes and icons that often just sink into the nav bar, rather that bubbling up on additional shapes. Both the Flipboard and Xbox Live apps have introduced such things to my daily mobile experiences recently, and I think that both work marvelously overall.

• The television market is another place that’s going to be fun to observe in 2012. I looked at a Google TV last year at about this time, and I’ve been testing out an Apple TV over the last couple of weeks. The Wall Street Journal reports that voice commands will likely be a part of the next generation of Apple TVs. Apple already has Siri out in the wild on the iPhone 4S, which no doubt means that they have been gathering lots more user data to funnel into a better voice interface for home entertainment systems. Microsoft began experimenting with a limited set of voice commands when it launched Kinect, so both companies are obviously looking at similar issues and looking for ways to distinguish themselves.

The Apple TV, from what I’ve experienced thus far, differentiates itself by emphasizing AirPlay, the ability to stream content directly from iPhones and iPads. Additionally, Apple seems to have been thinking about things from a Nintendo Wii U perspective, allowing developers to implement two-screen gaming experiences.

I think the Google TV largely failed out of the gate due to some poorly executed (and in many cases, un-executed) partnerships, but I’m sure it will remain a player to some extent as well. I’m looking forward to seeing what other trends and developments appear in 2012. Although, I won’t lie to you; in the voice-recognition race, I care a great deal more about who will finally bring me some software that does a halfway decent job of transcribing interviews.